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Difference Between Clear Soup and Miso Soup

    Difference Between Clear Soup and Miso Soup

    In Japanese culture, they consume a variety of soups that pair well with their meals. They are particularly pleasant on chilly, wet days. In Japan, ramen, miso, and udon soups are all popular.

    Miso soup is the most well-known. However, you have also likely heard of clear soup or Suimono. Both soups contain vegetables in the stock and onions and garnish. So if both soups have so many similarities, what is the difference between clear soup and miso soup? 

    The difference comes from the paste used to make Miso soup, which is known as miso paste. And it is not present in clear soup. So that’s where the difference happens. 

    Let’s get to know more about Miso soup and clear soup.

    What is Miso Soup?

    Vegetables, dashi (fish or seaweed stock), and miso paste (fermented soybeans) combine to make the broth for miso soup. The miso paste used to make miso soup is what gives it its distinctive, nearly impenetrable hue.

    Miso soup becomes even more healthy and beneficial to beauty and health when diverse components like vegetables and tofu are added. White rice and miso soup are staples in the Japanese diet.

    Accompanying many Japanese dishes is a bowl of miso soup. It’s so commonplace that it’s simple to gulp it down without giving it any attention.

    Miso soup is traditionally made with tofu and green onions. Other vegetables, such as carrots, mushrooms, and onions, are frequently added. Some folks add noodles as well.

    What is Clear Soup?

    This clear soup is sometimes referred to as “Miyabi soup.” Meat stock and veggies are simmered together to create Miyabi stock!

    After simmering the stock, the chef removes the vegetables from Miyabi, giving it a clear broth and the nickname “clear Japanese soup.”

    Suimono, also known as clear soup in Japan, is sometimes referred to as miso. This is because some individuals prepare suimono broth with the same-named paste, but its foundation is nearly always dashi stock. Their toppings are comparable, but their broth formulas are distinct.

    Difference Between Clear Soup and Miso Soup

    Vegetables, dashi (fish or seaweed stock), and miso paste (fermented soybeans) combine to make the broth for miso soup. However, Miyabi stock is made by simmering meat stock and veggies together. 

    What makes each dish unique are the components that go into it. For example, the miso paste used to make miso soup is what gives it its distinctive, nearly impenetrable hue.

    Miso, a fermented soybean paste, gives traditional miso soup its characteristic brown hue, while the clear soup known as suimono serves as a refreshing alternative. Miso is rarely used, but dashi stock seasoned with soy sauce and salt is the traditional base for the broth of suimono.

    Suimono, also known as clear soup in Japan, is sometimes referred to as miso. This is because some individuals prepare suimono broth with the same-named paste, but its foundation is nearly always dashi stock. Their toppings are comparable, but their broth formulas are distinct.

    Which is Better Soup: Miso or Clear Soup?

    Both soups are fantastic additions to a Japanese meal, and either would make an outstanding side dish with rice and stir-fried veggies or meat. 

    Miso has more protein and nutrition than other soups and can be served as a meal on its own. However, if you’re looking for a light, fiber-filled appetizer, Miyabi soup may be more to your liking.

    Bottom Line

    This was all about Miso and Clear Soup and the difference between clean soup and miso soup. So basically, the difference between them comes from the miso paste, which is fermented soybean paste, which gives miso its dark color. This paste is not used in clear soup. However, mostly all other ingredients are the same in both soups. 

    We hope you found this article helpful & informative. Please leave your valuable thoughts & suggestions in the comments.

    Thank you for reading!